The Bread She Bakes https://www.thebreadshebakes.com Bake wholesome #realbread at home with tried and tested recipes from The Bread She Bakes Sat, 08 Dec 2018 22:14:26 +0000 en-GB hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.0 Homemade baby breadsticks recipe https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/2018/12/homemade-baby-breadsticks-recipe/ https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/2018/12/homemade-baby-breadsticks-recipe/#respond Fri, 07 Dec 2018 10:41:38 +0000 https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/?p=4537   When it comes to feeding, my little baby daughter has never been a natural. And when I recently started to introduce solids, she steadfastly refused to be given anything from a spoon or my finger. No tasty purée could tempt her. She did however take the spoon if it was put in front of …

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When it comes to feeding, my little baby daughter has never been a natural. And when I recently started to introduce solids, she steadfastly refused to be given anything from a spoon or my finger. No tasty purée could tempt her. She did however take the spoon if it was put in front of her on her tray and into her mouth it went. I started giving her chunky finger foods such as broccoli florets which she could hold herself and after a few weeks I decided it was time to introduce some baby breadsticks for more a baby-led weaning approach.

Looking into baby’s nutritional requirements, The River Cottage Baby and Toddler Cookbook advises: “Under-fives are littler power-houses of development and growth. They need lots of energy, so starchy, calorie-dense foods are important – plenty of bread, pasta, rice and cereals. For adults, consuming starches in a high-fibre, wholegrain form is highly recommended. For little children, that’s not the case. Too much fibre can be over-filling and stop them eating other, nutrient-rich foods. Very high-fibre foods, such as bran cereals, can be hard for them to digest and may stop them absorbing nutrients. You don’t have to ban all wholegrain foods, but try to combine white and wholemeal bread, pasta and rice, gradually shifting more to wholegrain foods as your child matures.”

Based on my research, these are the foundations of my baby breadstick recipe:
  • Using mainly white flour (a mix of white wheat and spelt flours)
  • Adding a little bit of wholewheat flour (20% of all the flour in the recipe)
  • No salt
  • Adding yoghurt for some dairy and including a few tablespoons of rapeseed oil to add some fat/oil (both dairy as well as fat/oil are important pillars of baby’s nutritional needs)
  • Optional addition of ground herbs or spices into the breadstick dough to introduce baby to new flavours

Homemade baby breadsticks recipe

Pieces of toast and firm bread make good finer food and can be dipped into purees and sauces. Many baby rusks on the market contain as much sugar as a sweet biscuit. Opt to make your own sugar-free bread sticks instead. It’s super easy and you can make a big batch, freeze them and defrost as needed. You can add some herbs or spices into the breadstick dough if you want to mix it up for your baby. I sometimes divide the dough into three parts, leaving one part plain (with no added herbs or spices) and adding different herbs such as finely chopped rosemary or spices such as garam masala to the other two parts.

Ingredients

  • 200 g strong white wheat flour
  • 100 g white spelt flour
  • 75 g wholemeal wheat flour
  • 150 g yoghurt (plain, full fat)
  • 100 g water
  • 4 g dried yeast
  • 2 tbsp rapeseed oil
  • Optional: 1 tbsp finely ground herbs (e.g. rosemary, thyme… or spices (e.g. garam masala, mild curry powder…))

How to make baby breadsticks

  1. Combine all ingredients in a large bowl to form a dough
  2. Knead for 10 minutes on a work surface until you have  a smooth, even dough
  3. Place back into the bowl and cover
  4. Keep to proof at room temperature for an hour or so until the dough has visibly increased in volume
  5. Knock back the dough and split off walnut-sized pieces
  6. Roll each piece into a 10 cm rod
  7. Place on two lightly greased baking trays
  8. Leave to rise for about 20 minutes
  9. Bake at 200°C for 10 mins
  10. Leave to cool on a wire rack

Cut the breadsticks into halves (lengthwise) and toast them before giving them to your baby. This helps to avoid them softening too quickly. Always watch your baby carefully when offering them breadsticks and break off any big soggy bits before they disappear into the baby’s mouth to avoid choking. Dip both sides of the bread stick into your baby’s food 🙂
For those worried about food allergies, Annabel Karmel’s New Complete Baby and Toddler Meal Planner states: “There is no need to worry unduly about food allergies unless you have a family history of allergy or atopic disease. The incidence of food allergy in babies with no family history of allergy is very small (approximately 6%). (…) Don’t remove key foods such as milk or wheat from your child’s diet before consulting a doctor.

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Multigrain bread with home-milled multigrain flour https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/2018/11/multigrain-bread-multigrain-flour/ https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/2018/11/multigrain-bread-multigrain-flour/#respond Sun, 04 Nov 2018 12:47:34 +0000 https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/?p=4484   After a mini break from blogging due to the arrival of my sweet little baby daughter, I wanted to share my current go-to sourdough bread recipe with you. This multigrain sourdough bread has been the weekly staple loaf in our house over the last six months. It’s a super easy, yet wholesome and delicious …

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After a mini break from blogging due to the arrival of my sweet little baby daughter, I wanted to share my current go-to sourdough bread recipe with you. This multigrain sourdough bread has been the weekly staple loaf in our house over the last six months. It’s a super easy, yet wholesome and delicious recipe which I found easy to integrate into my new-baby-routine.

As with most sourdough recipes, it’s not difficult to fit the required steps into your day.  A few small steps at a time, 5-10 minutes here or there, is easy to fit around even a newborn baby’s needs.

Multigrain bread
Multigrain bread

Since giving birth, I use my grain mill a lot more. I now just have bags of grains (wheat, spelt, rye, oat, barley) at home and mill to fine flour or more roughly chopped grain mixtures as I see fit. I still need to use white flours as all flours milled by the grain mill are naturally wholegrain.

Multigrain bread recipe

Don’t be put off by the amount of steps needed – you will only need a few minutes at a time to bake this delicious multigrain loaf. This is  a solid loaf of bread full of delicious chopped whole grains and toasted seeds. It tastes delicious with both sweet and savoury toppings.

Multigrain bread recipe

With my grain mill it’s easy to make any combination of multigrain flour, three grain bread, four grain bread etc. This particular five-grain sourdough bread recipe uses a five-grain mix but you could easily use fewer grain varieties to the same effect, according to what you have at home or personal preference. The recipe for this bread is a modified version of the loaf ‘5-Korn-Kruste’ from the book Rustikale Brote in Deutschen Landen.

Multigrain bread ingredients

  • If you are using a mill at home to prepare the flour and chopped grains (prepare the various portions as needed on the day.)

For the sourdough

  • 20 g rye sourdough starter
  • 120 g wholemeal rye flour
  • 120 g water

For the toasted seed and grain soaker

  • 50 g sunflower seeds
  • 50 g pumpkin seeds
  • 150 g roughly chopped grains (a combination of wheat, spelt, rye, oat, barley grain – e.g. 30g each)
  • 3 g salt
  • 210 g boiling water

For the main dough

  • 220 g wholemeal wheat flour
  • 80 g wholemeal rye flour
  • 160 g water
  • 13 g salt
  • 1 tbsp malt extract

For the topping

  • A handful of chopped grains

How to make multigrain bread

Day 1

  1. Combine the sourdough ingredients in a medium bowl. Mix well and cover. Keep at room temperature for about 16-24 hours.
  2. To prepare the toasted seed and grain soaker, toast the seeds in a frying pan (without oil i.e. dry) until they start to release their nutty smell. Take the pan off the heat and add the chopped grains and salt. Mix well, then cover with boiling water. Cover the pan and leave to rest at room temperature for 16 hours.

Day 2

  1. Combine 240g of the refreshed sourdough with the seed and grain soaker and the other main dough ingredients in a large bowl.
  2. Knead for 10 minutes, then cover the bowl and leave to rest for about 45 minutes at room temperature.
  3. Prepare a bread tin (approximately 23 x 11 x 9.5 cm) and brush with sunflower oil.
  4. Knead the dough for another 5 minutes, then shape into an oval to fit into your bread tin.
  5. Brush the surface of the bread oval with water before rolling it in roughly chopped grains.
  6. Place in the bread tin, cover and proof at room temperature for several hours until it has risen to the top of the bread tin.
  7. Preheat the oven to 250C.
  8. Bake the loaf on the second lowest oven shelf for 15 minutes at 250C. Turn down the temperature to 180C and bake for a further 45 minutes.
  9. For a nice crust take the bread out of the tin at the end and place it back in the oven for another 15 minutes at 180C.
  10. Cool on a wire rack.

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Sesame semolina sourdough bread recipe https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/2018/04/sesame-semolina-bread-recipe/ https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/2018/04/sesame-semolina-bread-recipe/#respond Wed, 11 Apr 2018 12:19:12 +0000 https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/?p=3447   Over the last few weeks, I’ve been experimenting with a new flour – semolina. Its characteristics make it the perfect bread ingredient for a coarser, more textured bread. Semolina bread is a robust accompaniment for soups and salads – just in time for the spring greens entering my kitchen. My semolina bread recipe uses  …

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Over the last few weeks, I’ve been experimenting with a new flour – semolina. Its characteristics make it the perfect bread ingredient for a coarser, more textured bread. Semolina bread is a robust accompaniment for soups and salads – just in time for the spring greens entering my kitchen. My semolina bread recipe uses  small amounts of wholegrain flour to enhance the flavour profile as well as toasted sesame seeds.

Semolina bread

What is semolina flour?

  • Semolina is a type of flour made from durum wheat (triticum turgidum l. var. durum) i.e. it’s the ground endosperm of durum wheat. Durum wheat’s particular quality is that the floury material in the middle of the grain does not immediately reduce to a powder when milled; it holds together in granular lumps of sandy coarseness. This can be further milled to a fine flour, but is often used as it comes. 
  • It is pale yellow in colour.
  • Semolina is grainier than standard wheat flour. Semolina is available as coarse, medium or fine flour, based on the size of the grains.
  • Semolina flour is a high-gluten / high-protein flour as durum wheat has more protein than any other kind of wheat. “Protein is important because of its relationship to gluten. The more protein there is in a wheat, the more gluten there will be in a dough made from it.” Andrew Whitley, Bread Matters
  • Fine semolina flour is used to make pasta. Noodles made from semolina hold their shape well, and have a firm texture. Dough made with semolina is coherent but not very stretchy. 
  • Coarse semolina is also used to make couscous.
  • In South India, semolina is used to make foods like dosa and upma.
  • In Germany and Austria semolina is known as Grieß.
  • Semolina and polenta – though similar in texture – are quite different. The former is derived from the wheat berry, and the latter from cornmeal.

Semolina flour

Semolina For Bread Making

  • As a rule of thumb, fine semolina flour is preferred over coarse semolina for bread making. The coarse grains in semolina have a puncturing effect on the dough, adversely affecting dough strength and bread volume. However, it can produce a surprisingly smooth and extensible dough.
  • A high percentage of semolina flour gives bread a soft golden colour.
  • Semolina (farina di semola rimacinata) is an essential ingredient in Italian-Sicilian bread baking and also used frequently in Moroccan bread baking e.g. for khobz dyal smida or pan-fried harcha bread.

Where to buy semolina

You will find semolina in most well-stocked supermarkets or health food stores. My online store of choice here in the UK is BuyWholefoodsOnline.co.uk.

Semolina bread recipe

How to make semolina bread

  • My semolina bread recipe below uses my existing sourdough starter to raise the bread.
  • I’ve combined fine semolina flour with portions of wholegrain wheat and wholegrain rye flour to enhance the overall flavour profile.
  • Fennel seeds are often used in semolina bread baking, as are sesame seeds and I’ve decided to add sesame seeds into my recipe. A light toasting of the seeds adds even more flavour.

Semolina bread recipe

Sesame Semolina Sourdough Bread Recipe

Bake this delicious sesame semolina bread as a perfect side for spring and summer salads.

Ingredients

    Sourdough

    • 100 g sourdough starter
    • 50 g wholemeal flour
    • 50 g rye flour
    • 100 g water

    Main Dough

    • 700 g semolina flour
    • 150 g wholemeal flour
    • 150 g rye flour
    • 100 g sesame seeds
    • 20 g salt
    • 750 g water
    1. On day 1, refresh your sourdough starter by combining 50g wholemeal flour, 50g wholegrain rye flour and 100g water with your sourdough starter.
    2. On day 2, lightly toast the sesame seeds, then combine 200g of the refreshed sourdough starter from day 1 with the main dough ingredients in a large bowl.
    3. Combine well to form a dough and knead for 10 minutes on a clean work surface.
    4. Place the dough back into the bowl to rest for 1 hour at room temperature.
    5. Give the dough another thorough knead, then shape and place into a large, lightly oiled loaf tin.
    6. Leave to rest and rise until fully proven.
    7. Preheat the oven to 220°C in time for baking, then bake for 10 minutes at 220°C before turning down the temperature to 180°C for another 50 minutes.
    8. Cool on a wire rack.

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    Vegetable Strudel Recipe (Gemüsestrudel) https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/2018/03/vegetable-strudel-recipe-gemusestrudel/ https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/2018/03/vegetable-strudel-recipe-gemusestrudel/#respond Fri, 16 Mar 2018 09:53:57 +0000 https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/?p=4416   Although vegetarian and vegan dishes have become much more common on Austrian restaurant menus, the Gemüsestrudel (vegetable strudel) has traditionally been one of the token veggie dish on many Gasthaus menus. Quite remarkably for Austrian Gemüsestrudel recipes however, these typically come with ham (!). Dairy products (curd cheese, crème fraiche, milk, cheese) are also heavily …

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    Although vegetarian and vegan dishes have become much more common on Austrian restaurant menus, the Gemüsestrudel (vegetable strudel) has traditionally been one of the token veggie dish on many Gasthaus menus. Quite remarkably for Austrian Gemüsestrudel recipes however, these typically come with ham (!). Dairy products (curd cheese, crème fraiche, milk, cheese) are also heavily used in Austrian vegetable strudel recipes.  I left the ham out of this version of my mum’s vegetable strudel recipe, but you will see, it is still a far cry from a vegan recipe. It’s delicious though, and all the hard work that goes into the preparation is definitely worth it!

    Vegetable Strudel
    Vegetable Strudel

    Austrian Vegetable Strudel Recipe

    This vegetable strudel recipe can perhaps be more accurately described as vegetable-cheese strudel as cheese and other dairy products including curd cheese feature heavily in the filling.

    Vegetable Strudel Recipe
    Vegetable Strudel with a lovely golden brown colour, sprinkled with sesame seeds

    As the strudel dough needs to be rolled out quite thinly, it’s advisable to use a very large soft linen cloth (Strudeltuch e.g. 120 x 100 cm) or otherwise a large cotton kitchen towel to roll out the dough and assemble the strudel. This makes it much easier to transfer the dough to the baking tray.

    The vegetable strudel recipe below is made with homemade Strudel-dough, but if you are short in time, you can use shop-bought puff pastry or filo pastry.

    Any leftovers can easily be frozen.

    Savoury vegetable strudel recipe

    A deliciously cheesy vegetable strudel, as per an Austrian recipe from my mum. Put together your own vegetable mix based on your preferred veggies or based on seasons. Spring Strudel (Kohlrabi, cauliflower, asparagus, broccoli, spinach, wild garlic, leeks), Summer Strudel (mushrooms, beans, tomatoes, courgettes, fennel, peppers, aubergines, peas, sweet corn), Autumn Strudel (pumpkin, cabbage, root vegetables, potatoes), Winter Strudel (carrots, cabbage, Brussels sprouts, shallots). 

    Strudel Dough Ingredients

    • 250 g plain flour
    • 1 tbsp olive or rapeseed oil
    • 125 g water (lukewarm – this will help with dough elasticity)
    • 1/2 tsp salt

    Béchamel Sauce Ingredients

    • 40 g butter
    • 1 onion (finely chopped)
    • 40 g plain flour
    • 250 g milk
    • 1/2 tsp nutmeg (ground)

    Filling

    • 200 g curd cheese (full fat)
    • 125 g crème fraîche
    • 2 egg yolks
    • 250 g mature cheddar or other flavoursome hard cheese (in Austria I would use Bergkäse) (grated)
    • 4 tbsp fresh herbs (mix of parsley, thyme, oregano, rosemary, marjoram, basil, dill, fennel etc. whatever you fancy or you have to hand)
    • 100 g oats
    • 2 egg whites
    • 1 tsp corn starch or potato starch
    • 300 g potatoes
    • 1 green or red pepper
    • 2 garlic cloves
    • 1 carrot
    • 1 small leek
    • 50 g frozen peas
    • 50 g frozen sweet corn kernels
    • Salt & freshly ground pepper to taste

    Topping

    • 25 g butter (melted)
    • Sesame seeds

    Prepare the vegetables for the filling

    1. Boil 300g potatoes and mash them. If you prefer a finer texture, you can also use a potato ricer to process the boiled potatoes.

    2. Cut the pepper and the carrot into small cubes, mince the garlic and thinly slice the leek. Using a knob of butter, fry these vegetables for around 10 minutes. Briefly simmer the frozen peas and frozen sweetcorn kernels, then strain well and add to the fried vegetable mix. The vegetables should retain ‘bite’ and not be overcooked. Altogether, you should use about 500g of vegetables (fresh and frozen). Make sure there is no excess liquid left in the vegetable mixture by the time you set it aside to cool.

    Prepare the Béchamel Sauce

    1. Start by placing the butter in a pot to heat up, then add the diced onions. 

    2. Fry for a few minutes – don’t let the onions brown.

    3. Add the flour and stir thoroughly for a minute.

    4. Add the milk and nutmeg and continue stirring until the sauce has thickened.

    5. Take away from the heat and leave to cool.

    Prepare the dough

    1. Combine the dough ingredients in a medium bowl and mix together. I do this with my hands.

    2. Knead well until you have a formed a smooth dough. Don’t be tempted to add any more water to the dough. It will come together well, just give it some time.

    3. Shape dough into a ball, brush with a little oil, place back in the bowl and cover the bowl.

    4. Leave to rest for 30 minutes at room temperature. This helps the dough structure to relax and makes it easier to roll/shape later on.

    Prepare the filling

    1. In a large bowl, combine the cooled Béchamel Sauce, curd cheese, crème fraîche, egg yolks, grated cheese, herbs and oats. Mix well.

    2. Add the vegetable mixture and mashed potatoes and mix well. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

    3. In a smaller bowl, combine the egg whites and starch and whip until stiff.

    4. Carefully fold the stiff egg whites into the remaining filling. The filling should not be wet so it doesn’t soak through the dough while you assemble the strudel.

    Shape the dough

    1. Preheat the oven to 175℃.

    2. Flour your work surface (ideally a large linen or cotton kitchen towel) and use your hands to form the dough ball into an even rectangle.

    3. Flour the dough rectangle to prevent it from sticking and – using a rolling pin – take care to roll out the dough into a bigger rectangle.

    4. Line a suitably big baking tray with baking paper.

    Assemble the Strudel

    1. Distribute the filling across two thirds of the strudel dough, leaving at least 1 cm around the edges free.

    2. Brush the final third with butter.

    3. Fold in the sides of the dough slightly over the filling to seal the sides.

    4. Roll into a strudel and carefully seal all the ends. If you are using the linen or cotton towel, the rolling can be done just by lifting the towel to roll the dough.

    5. Place seam-side down onto the baking tray. Again, this process is easier if you are using the cloth, as you can lift the strudel much more easily like this and carefully roll it onto the baking tray.

    6. Brush with the egg and sprinkle with sesame seeds.

    Bake & serve

    1. Bake for 30 to 40 minutes until golden brown.

    2. Serve warm with a side salad.

    Add variety to your vegetable strudel by adding ground spices such as caraway, paprika, cayenne pepper or chili flakes. You can also add seeds such as sunflower and pumpkin seeds or boiled grains (e.g. rye grains or millet) into the strudel filling if you like. Make sure the grains are no longer wet before you add them.a

    Serve with a crisp side salad.

     

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    Low glycemic index bread: barley flour bread recipe https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/2018/02/low-glycemic-index-bread-barley-flour-bread-recipe/ https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/2018/02/low-glycemic-index-bread-barley-flour-bread-recipe/#respond Sat, 24 Feb 2018 16:51:57 +0000 https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/?p=3909   Although barley is almost exclusively used in the brewing industry on account of its very low gluten content, barley flour is a really nice ingredient to introduce into bread baking. You’ll have even more reason for using barley if you are looking to keep the glycemic index (GI) of your home-baked bread as low …

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    Although barley is almost exclusively used in the brewing industry on account of its very low gluten content, barley flour is a really nice ingredient to introduce into bread baking. You’ll have even more reason for using barley if you are looking to keep the glycemic index (GI) of your home-baked bread as low as possible. I’ve been baking with barley flour ever since I came across the delicious barley rusks (used to prepare Dakos) hugely popular on the Greek island of Crete and after lots of research and experimentation I’d like to share my barley flour bread recipe with you.

    Dakos
    Dakos – If you’d like to make Greek barley rusks at home try this recipe which uses 44% barley flour… https://akispetretzikis.com/categories/snak-santoyits/kritharokoyloyres

     

    Firstly though, I want to give you some background on barley flour and the glycemic index GI/ glycemic load GL values of different types of grains.

    Barley flour bread is low GI bread

    I’ve recently looked into low glycemic bread options as I’ve had to ensure my blood sugar levels were as stable as possible throughout the day for health reasons connected to my pregnancy. Out of all the grains, barley seems to come out on top. It contains a soluble fiber called beta-glucan which has been shown to slow glucose absorption and thought to help lower blood cholesterol.

    The table below shows (reasonably) comprehensive information comparing the GI and GL of different grains, flours and one specific brand of bread. Data source: http://www.diogenes-eu.org/GI-Database/Default.htm

    “The Glycemic Index (GI) is a relative ranking of carbohydrate in foods according to how they affect blood glucose levels. Carbohydrates with a low GI value are more slowly digested, absorbed and metabolised and cause a lower and slower rise in blood glucose and, therefore usually, insulin levels. Glycemic Load (or GL) combines both the quantity and quality of carbohydrates.  It is also the best way to compare blood glucose values of different types and amounts of foods. The formula for calculating the GL of a particular food or meal is: Glycemic Load = GI x Carbohydrate (g) content per portion ÷ 100.Source: https://www.gisymbol.com/

    The Glycemic Index Foundation suggests that a GI of 45 or less is classified as low GI. For GL, 10 or less qualifies as low GL.

    From the table below, we can see that only barley is low GI and none of the grains or flours listed qualify as low GL. Nonetheless, barley scores well.

    Food name GI value GL
    Pearl barley raw 25 21
    Vogel’s sunflower and barley brown bread 40 16
    Porridge Oats 58 20
    Crispbread rye 64 45
    Bran wheat 70 19
    Wheatgerm 70 31
    Rye bread 70 32
    Wheat flour wholemeal 70 45
    Wheat flour brown 70 48
    Wheat flour white for breadmaking 70 53
    Rye flour  whole 70 53
    Wheat flour white plain 70 54

    My barley bread recipe has taken inspiration from the above-mentioned Vogel’s sunflower and barley brown bread, incorporating both wheat and barley flours as well as sunflower seeds.

    Barley flour bread recipe (sourdough barley bread)

    Opt for barley bread if you are looking for a hearty addition to a low-GI diet. 

    Barley flour bread recipe
    Barley flour bread recipe

    It is best to use barley flour in conjunction with high-gluten flour. My barley flour recipe uses 50% barley flour and 50% wholewheat flour to ensure the bread rises better. By adding at least 50% wheat flour benefits the crumb. In the interest of flavour and extensibility, I wouldn’t recommend to increase the % of barley flour. The higher the percentage of barley in relation to wheat, the less extensible the dough. I increased the dough hydration as well in order to account for the higher water absorption of the flours.

    Barley flour bread low glycemic
    Barley flour bread – low glycemic index bread

    Barley flour bread recipe

    Barley flour adds a pronounced sweetness and a suggestion of maltiness to this loaf. This is even more pronounced due to the added barley flake soaker. Add in some pre-boiled barley kernels to make a coarser type of barley bread if you wish.

    Ingredients

      Sourdough Ingredients

      • 100 g wheat sourdough starter (100% hydration)
      • 50 g wholewheat flour
      • 50 g water (lukewarm)
      • Barley Flake & Sunflower Seed Soaker Ingredients
      • 50 g barley flakes
      • 50 g sunflower seeds
      • 100 g hot water

      Main Dough Ingredients

      • 250 g wholewheat flour
      • 250 g barley flour
      • 10 g salt
      • 320 g water (lukewarm)
      • 100 g natural yoghurt

      Toppings

      • 1 handful of sunflower seeds
      • 1 handful of barley flakes

      How to make barley flour sourdough bread

        Day 1  – Refresh your sourdough starter & prepare the soaker

        1. In a medium bowl, combine all the sourdough ingredients, cover with a lid and keep at room temperature until the next day.

        2. Toast the barley flakes and sunflower seeds in a frying pan (no oil) to release the nutty flavours, then take off the heat, add the boiling water and cover immediately. Set aside at room temperature.

        Day 2 (about 24 hours later) – Prepare the main dough, proof & bake

        1. Combine 100g of the refreshed sourdough (the rest goes back into the fridge for future bakes) with all the remaining ingredients (the soaker you prepared the day before and all of the main dough ingredients) and knead for about 10 mins. The dough will be sticky yet pliable.

        2. Leave the dough to rest for about an hour.

        3. Oil a bread baking tin and distribute a handful of sunflower seeds across the bottom of the tin, covering the surface evenly.

        4. Transfer the dough into the oiled and seeded bread baking tin, evenly distribute the barley flakes across the top of the dough and cover with a lid or a polythene bag to keep the moisture in.

        5. Rest until fully proofed (this takes a good 4 hours in my cool kitchen) and preheat the oven to 220°C in time.

        6. Bake at 220°C for 10 mins, and at 200°C for a further 40 mins.
        7. Leave to cool on a wire rack.

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        Moreish mushroom bread pudding recipe https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/2018/02/mushroom-bread-pudding-recipe/ https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/2018/02/mushroom-bread-pudding-recipe/#respond Mon, 05 Feb 2018 13:00:39 +0000 https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/?p=4325   I’d like to introduce you to this gorgeously moreish mushroom bread pudding recipe. It combines mushrooms – luxuriously delicious and earthy in their own right – with a velvety and creamy bread pudding base. The perfect comfort food, it’s also a great way to reduce wastage of leftover or stale bread. This savoury bread …

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        I’d like to introduce you to this gorgeously moreish mushroom bread pudding recipe. It combines mushrooms – luxuriously delicious and earthy in their own right – with a velvety and creamy bread pudding base. The perfect comfort food, it’s also a great way to reduce wastage of leftover or stale bread.

        Mushroom bread pudding
        Mushroom bread pudding

        This savoury bread pudding recipe makes a scrumptious side dish (serve with roast chicken for example) but also works perfectly well as a mid-week lunch or dinner, ideally with a sharp salad on the side.

        A few words on choosing your mushroom bread pudding ingredients…

        The mushrooms

        Choose your mushrooms well! They will lend the bread pudding their distinctive flavour. Go for white or brown button mushrooms if you can’t get your hands on other varieties with a more unique taste, but if available, try to at least mix in some porcini or shiitake mushrooms. Go and harvest your own wild mushrooms if you can and make them the main event of the bread pudding!

        Mixed mushrooms
        Mixed mushrooms

        “Mushrooms don’t have any chlorophyll, so are unable to harvest energy from sunlight, which means they have to do all their growing underground, feeding on whatever they find. So, mushrooms that grow under chestnut trees taste of chestnuts and soil. Mushrooms that grow under pine trees taste of pines and soil.Yotam Ottolenghi, The Guardian

        Mushrooms have also received a lot of press coverage of late for their health properties and if you’d like to read more about this, take a look at this article for a short overview or watch this video for a fascinating interview with mycologist Joe Rogan.

        The bread

        Lots of bread puddings use brioche or challah as the bread base. However, for this savoury mushroom bread pudding, I prefer the earthy flavours of sourdough bread containing rye flour e.g. pain de champagne.

        The cheese

        You can use cheddar cheese as your base cheese, but I like to at least mix in some other flavours e.g. Gruyère or Parmesan. Your cheese choice (same as your mushroom and bread choices) will have a big impact on the bread pudding’s flavour.

        Mushroom bread pudding recipe

        If you’ve only ever made sweet bread puddings, there’s no better time to try a savoury one. Warning: this is not for the faint-hearted (i.e. people on a diet), take a look at the ingredient list to find out why 🙂

        Mushroom bread pudding recipe
        Mushroom bread pudding recipe

        Mushroom Bread Pudding Recipe

        Combine the best and most flavoursome ingredients you can find and bake this mushroom bread pudding recipe to perfection – with a crisp surface and melting interior. Choose a deeper casserole dish for a more tender pudding, a shallower dish if you like to have more of the crusty top layer. 

        Ingredients

        • 300 g fresh bread cubes, ideally sourdough rye bread (cut into 5 mm cubes)
        • 2 tbsp unsalted butter
        • 1 onion (chopped)
        • 450 g mixed fresh mushrooms (trimmed and cut into 1 cm cubes)
        • 2 large garlic cloves (minced)
        • 5 tbsp white wine
        • 1 small bunch of parsley ((or other herbs, whatever flavour you prefer))
        • 125 g milk
        • 100 g creme fraiche
        • 90 g single cream
        • 2 large eggs
        • 50 g Parmesan cheese (grated)
        • Salt
        • Freshly ground pepper

        How to make mushroom bread pudding

        1. Preheat oven to 180°C.
        2. Toast bread cubes in in a large shallow baking pan until golden-brown, about 10 minutes.

        3. Heat the butter in a medium-large frying pan. Add the chopped onion and fry over a medium heat, stirring occasionally, until it begins to soften.
          Add the chopped mushrooms, minced garlic, 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon freshly milled pepper. Continue to fry and stir until the liquid the mushrooms give off has evaporated (about 15 minutes). 
          Add the white wine and parsley and continue to fry and stir for another few minutes. 
          Check the seasoning and remove from the heat.

        4. In a medium-large bowl, combine the milk, creme fraiche, single cream, eggs and grated Parmesan cheese, 1/2 teaspoon salt and 1/4 teaspoon freshly milled pepper. 
          Whisk together well. 
          Stir in the toasted bread cubes and the mushroom mixture until coated well and let stand for 10 minutes to allow the bread to absorb some of the cream and egg mixture.

        5. Butter the baking dish. I used a square dish (20 x 20 cm), about 8 cm deep.

        6. Spoon the mixture into the baking dish and place on a rack in the lower third of the oven. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes until nicely browned on top. Please note that the baking time will depend on the depth of the baking dish you have chosen.

         

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        Chickpea flour pancakes for weekend breakfast https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/2018/01/chickpea-flour-pancakes-recipe/ https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/2018/01/chickpea-flour-pancakes-recipe/#respond Mon, 15 Jan 2018 13:00:02 +0000 https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/?p=4338   A new year, a new pancake recipe! This time, using chickpea flour. I’ve baked with chickpea flour before and always thought chickpea flour pancakes were a particularly nice way of using chickpea flour in baking. These chickpea flour pancakes are super light and fluffy (without the use of baking powder) and make an excellent …

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        A new year, a new pancake recipe! This time, using chickpea flour. I’ve baked with chickpea flour before and always thought chickpea flour pancakes were a particularly nice way of using chickpea flour in baking. These chickpea flour pancakes are super light and fluffy (without the use of baking powder) and make an excellent weekend breakfast choice. Unfortunately, they are not quite vegan due to the added egg, but certainly a good option for anyone on a vegetarian diet.

        Chickpea flour pancakes
        Chickpea flour pancakes

        For more chickpea flour baking ideas including my recipe for chickpea flour and fennel sourdough bread, take a look at my chickpea flour baking post from a few years ago.

        Chickpea pancakes
        Chickpea pancakes

        Chickpea flour pancakes recipe

        This chickpea pancakes recipe uses a little bit of dried yeast as well as an egg to help them rise and make them light and fluffy.

        The pancakes themselves don’t include any spices such as cumin, coriander, mustard seeds or turmeric – as can often be found in Indian chickpea pancakes. Instead, I like to serve them plain or add some fresh ingredients (onion, chili and coriander leaves) to the batter.

        Serve with your choice of savoury topping; I’ve included some suggestions below.

        Chickpea pancakes recipe

        These chickpea pancakes are best served with a savoury topping. My personal topping of choice is a fresh salad of avocado, cherry tomatoes, rocket leaves or lamb’s lettuce, seasoned with olive or rapeseed oil, salt, pepper and a little bit of lemon/lime juice. A spoonful of natural yoghurt on the side works well with this. Note: If you prefer to serve your chickpea flour pancakes plain, just leave out the onion, chili and coriander leaves from the recipe below. Yotam Ottolenghi serves his plain chickpea pancakes with this tasty spiced aubergine and coriander topping.

        Ingredients

        • 200 g chickpea flour
        • 4 g dried yeast
        • 1/4 tsp salt
        • 1 small egg (beaten)
        • 200 g water
        • 1/2 onion (finely chopped)
        • 1/2 fresh chili (green or red) (finely chopped)
        • Fresh coriander leaves (a few sprigs, finely chopped)

        How to make chickpea pancakes

        1. Combine the chickpea flour, yeast and salt in a bowl.

        2. Add the beaten egg and the water.

        3. Add the chopped onion, chili and coriander leaves and combine well.

        4. Cover and set aside for an hour, until nice and frothy.

        5. Make the pancakes in a non-stick frying pan by heating up oil (I use a silicone brush to distribute a layer of oil evenly across the frying pan surface area). Use 3 tbsp of batter per pancake.

        6. Serve immediately.

        For more breakfast pancake recipe ideas, take a look at my buckwheat groats pancake recipe, this recipe for sorghum flour pancakes with options for both sweet and savoury breakfast pancakes or this recipe for galettes de sarrasin.

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        Bread during pregnancy: notes from a baker https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/2017/12/bread-during-pregnancy-white-brown/ https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/2017/12/bread-during-pregnancy-white-brown/#respond Tue, 19 Dec 2017 17:48:42 +0000 https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/?p=4319   I wanted to write a quick post on eating bread during pregnancy. With bread playing such a big role in my daily food routine, and at 25 weeks pregnant, a special post devoted to this feels appropriate 🙂 Here are my general tips around bread during pregnancy According to the NHS UK; “starchy foods …

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        I wanted to write a quick post on eating bread during pregnancy. With bread playing such a big role in my daily food routine, and at 25 weeks pregnant, a special post devoted to this feels appropriate 🙂

        Here are my general tips around bread during pregnancy

        • According to the NHS UK; “starchy foods (carbohydrates) – including bread – should make up just over a third of the food you eat.”
        • However, try to limit or cut out white bread (and other ‘white carbs’ such as white rice or pasta) during pregnancy as much as possible.
        • Instead, opt for brown / wholegrain / multigrain breads, brown rice and wholemeal pasta.
        • If you are prone to snacking on sweets, incorporate some dried fruit into your loaf of bread instead. This date and nut loaf for example makes for a delicious breakfast bread or afternoon snack.
        • Adding nuts to your bread dough will add some much-needed protein into your diet too and, in general, I recommend to add seeds (e.g. sesame seeds are a good source of calcium) and extra wheat bran (for added fibre) to any bread you bake.
        Healthy whole grain bread
        Healthy whole grain bread

        The best bread during pregnancy?

        If you are looking to start baking your own bread during pregnancy or if you are looking to bake healthier loaves during pregnancy, take a look at this post on healthy bread from earlier this year.

        Wholemeal sourdough pita bread pocket
        Wholemeal sourdough pita bread pocket

        There is good dietary advice on the NHS (UK) website and a lot of this can easily be put into practice with your daily choice of bread.

        Here are my recipe tips:

        • Try this wholemeal pita bread recipe and pair it with homemade hummus, carrot and celery sticks if you fancy a savoury snack.
        • This Greek pastry snack with folate-rich spinach and feta cheese also ticks a few of the recommended dietary boxes.
        • Crispbread can be a life saver in the first three months of feeling nauseous and queasy; I found it really easy to eat during the tricky first trimester.
        • And if you are following a ‘eat little and often’ pregnancy routine, this oatcakes recipe is ideal.

        All the best!

        Disclaimer:

        All content on The Bread She Bakes is provided for general information only, and should not be treated at all as a substitute for the medical advice of your own doctor or any other health care professional. The Bread She Bakes will not be responsible or liable for any diagnosis made by a user based on the content on www.thebreadshebakes.com and we are also not liable for the content of any external websites or links from this site to any other websites. Please always consult your own doctor if you’re in any way concerned about any aspect of your health.

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        Buckwheat crackers recipe https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/2017/11/buckwheat-crackers-recipe/ https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/2017/11/buckwheat-crackers-recipe/#respond Mon, 20 Nov 2017 21:02:52 +0000 https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/?p=4224   I love the taste buckwheat flour adds to baked goods. If you are in need of a quick buckwheat flavour fix, I’ve got a great buckwheat crackers recipe idea for you – a fantastic way of making quick crispbreads for when you need that savoury snack. Buckwheat crackers recipe This buckwheat crispbread goes well …

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        I love the taste buckwheat flour adds to baked goods. If you are in need of a quick buckwheat flavour fix, I’ve got a great buckwheat crackers recipe idea for you – a fantastic way of making quick crispbreads for when you need that savoury snack.

        Buckwheat flour crackers
        Buckwheat flour crackers

        Buckwheat crackers recipe

        This buckwheat crispbread goes well with smoked fish or cured meats, with cheeses and pickles. Break the crispbread into smaller bits and you can serve up a delicious bowl of buckwheat crisps with your favourite dip.

        Buckwheat crackers ingredients

        • 120 g whole-wheat flour
        • 90 g unbleached all-purpose flour
        • 90 g buckwheat flour
        • 15 g sesame seeds
        • 4 g salt
        • 40 g extra virgin olive oil or rapeseed oil
        • 120 g water (as needed)

        How to make buckwheat crackers

        1. Preheat the oven to 180°C with two racks positioned inside and line two baking trays with baking paper.
        2. Combine all ingredients in a bowl and form a dough. Ensure the dough is nice and smooth, not too runny and not too firm. Add a little more water if it’s not very elastic.
        3. Knead for a few minutes.
        4. Lightly dust your work surface, and roll out the dough.
        5. Cut into desired shapes — squares or cookie-cutter shapes — and place on the baking sheet, close together but not touching.
        6. Bake for around 20 minutes until lightly browned, switching the sheet trays halfway through from front to back and top to middle.
        7. Cool on a wire rack.

        These crackers are delicious with cheeses and pickles or smoked fish and cottage cheese.

        Buckwheat cracker
        Buckwheat cracker

        For more buckwheat inspiration, head over here for my buckwheat bread recipe or give this buckwheat pancake recipe a go for your next weekend breakfast. Galettes de sarrasin and buckwheat muffins provide great brunch options too.

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        Malt bread recipe https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/2017/10/malt-bread-recipe/ https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/2017/10/malt-bread-recipe/#respond Sun, 29 Oct 2017 20:01:11 +0000 https://www.thebreadshebakes.com/?p=4189   I love the flavour of malt and the sweet, fruity and slightly squidgy malt loaves which are brilliant for an afternoon snack, whether that’s at home or on a long walk with a hot cup of tea from the thermal flask. However, malt extract can also be a superb addition to a savoury loaf …

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        I love the flavour of malt and the sweet, fruity and slightly squidgy malt loaves which are brilliant for an afternoon snack, whether that’s at home or on a long walk with a hot cup of tea from the thermal flask. However, malt extract can also be a superb addition to a savoury loaf of bread and I wanted to share my malt bread recipe for a deliciously unique loaf.

        Malt bread loaf
        Malt bread loaf

        “A typical non-diastatic product is the malt syrup that can be easily bought in jars at a health food shop. It is a sweet syrup, rich in maltose that can be used directly as yeast food.  It also delivers that malty  flavour, and by raising sugar levels it ensures bright crust colour because the yeast will not have had time to eat all the sugars present, and plenty will be left to caramelise in the crust.”
        See more about using malt in baking here.

        Malt Bread Recipe

        Malt syrup helps the rise of the dough and adds a slight tan color to the loaf. The fresh potatoes in this recipe will keep the baked loaf fresh for longer.

        Malt bread recipe
        Malt bread recipe

        Malt Bread Ingredients

        For the sourdough (‘Monheimer Salzsauerteig’)

        Please note, this dough is using salt in the sourdough refreshment, so make sure you have more leftover starter in the fridge than you are using here as you will be using the full sourdough refreshment in the main dough.

        If you’d like to find out more about this salted sourdough refreshment, take a look here. Benefits include a more intensive aroma and better crumb.

        • 18g rye sourdough starter
        • 90g wholemeal rye flour
        • 90g water (ideal temperature for this process is 45°C)
        • 2g salt

        For the main dough

        • 300g potatoes
        • 30g wholemeal rye flour
        • 480g strong white bread flour
        • 3g dried yeast
        • 13g salt
        • 135g water
        • 1 tablespoon malt extract
        Malt bread
        Malt bread

        How to Make Malt Bread

        1. On day 1, prepare the Monheimer Salzsauerteig (salted sourdough) by combining the ingredients in a medium bowl. Cover and leave to rest at room temperature for 15 to 20 hours.
        2. On day 2, peel the potatoes and finely grate into a large bowl.
        3. Add the refreshed, salted sourdough (all of it), as well as all the other main dough ingredients into the large bowl.
        4. Combine to form a smooth dough.
        5. On a clean work surface, knead for 20 minutes.
        6. Place the dough back into the bowl, cover and leave to rest at room temperature for 30 minutes.
        7. Prepare a proofing basket.
        8. Punch down the dough, shape into a loaf, cover with flour, then place seam-side up in the proofing basket.
        9. Cover with a polythene bag and leave to prove at room temperature for about an hour.
        10. Preheat the oven to 220°C (and if using a baking dome preheat this from cold at the same time).
        11. Bake for 60 minutes. If using the baking dome, take off the lid for the last 10 minutes.
        12. Cool on a wire rack.

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